Challenges faced by foreign teachers in China

From my experience and observations whilst teaching in China there seem to be two broad category of expat teachers – young, freshly graduated “skylarkers” looking for some extra income, the majority of whom don’t really have a passion for teaching, education nor any intentions of committing to a school and, professional, career-minded teachers who keep on educating themselves and keep current with new, effective methods of teaching. Of course there are those who fall somewhere in between; the individuals who perhaps did not want to teach but were somehow led/advised that it would be a safe path for the short or mid-term until they could find themselves in better, more interesting/higher paying fields of work.

My article deals with a few of the main concerns that are faced by teachers that fall into the second category. Many foreigners that are career teachers go to China with very high expectations from nearly all aspects of management. From the very beginning they are subject to vast amounts of miscommunication with recruiters and schools that are interested in hiring them. They are sold the idea that their worth is less than they think, that teachers on the whole aren’t really highly paid. Whilst the teaching industry is not the most affluent, teachers do deserve respectable salaries for all their merits. Think about it, a lawyer spends years becoming a qualified professional in his/her field. Does a teacher not do the same? A bachelor’s degree and a Master’s degree are not cheap. TEFL or CELTA courses are not free. All the time you spend learning your skills should be considered by schools and recruiters when they are thinking of hiring you. Unfortunately, that is less and less the case these days.

Education is a philosophy, not a business. In China, however, everything is business. – Mustafa Yildiz

Instead of acquiring professionals that would not only produce quality work but stay with a school that they felt comfortable in, many institutions hire an image that they think would boost the appeal of their company. White faces, light hair and eyes that aren’t brown. That sounds like racism, you say? It is. The small percentage of schools that don’t have those racist tendencies still have the other vice that’s plaguing would-be-teachers – the Native English Speaker requirement. In reality a lot of schools use this requirement as some sort of code for “Caucasian” as they quote a new government rule that Native English Countries are only a handful or the largest political powers worldwide – America, the UK, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa. Why the hell is anyone really bothering to learn English if only these few countries speak the language then?

As a side note, I’d like to mention that so far, the best English language teachers I’ve met have all been second language speakers. There is no way any native speaker could break down grammar the way those second language speakers did to me. All the stuff I glossed over in Primary school and essentially ignored in high school were studied by these people like one studies to become an astronaut. Thoroughly.

Another point of contention are the ridiculous new heights of oppression that foreign teachers’ contracts are getting to. Not only are teachers are being made to haggle and bargain for salaries that barely match their qualifications and experience but some companies have turned it into a game. I personally had the experience of one school allowing their recruiting company to handle the salary negotiations. I was told via email at nearly midnight (it was truly by chance that I had checked my emails that late that night) that I had passed the interview and I had a maximum of 12 hours to submit a salary expectation/request. The thing is, if my salary request was too high it would be rejected by the school board and I would have one more chance to give them a suitable salary quote. After that I would no longer be a suitable candidate.

Welcome to the Hunger Games: school hiring edition.

What if my salary request was too low or actually a lot lower than what the school thought I could be paid? I am still waiting for a reply to that question.

As for the contracts themselves, there are a lot of deduction policies that I haven’t really seen/experienced anywhere else. Among the more intimidating ones were thing like a company being able to terminate your contract without compensation if you did not attend work and could not contact them for 16 hours. Monetary deductions for punctuality and students’ performances in tests, the list actually does go on.

In addition to this there are even some companies that do not even offer decent holiday packages for their teachers. So on top of harsh contract conditions (which one recruiter even got offended and told us was standard fare in China), a low salary and multiple opportunities for deductions, there is also the really depressing cherry of working during the major holiday periods. Whilst your friends at public and private schools get three weeks off for Spring Festival, you get three days from some training centers. Good job, Chinese management.

I have come to believe that modern Chinese management is all about how much you can control your assets. There is a strong feeling that positive reinforcement is weak and would be ignored outright. Western, open-minded ways of teaching are desired on the surface but not in actuality. I even got the impression from some teachers that the unhappier you are, i.e., the more stressed out about your job, the more you give without asking for anything and generally the less opinion you have, the better you are treated in the long run by management. It’s absolutely not true. The more you are of the aforementioned things, the more you are taken advantage of and flat out disrespected by management.

So, whilst there seems to be a lot of negativity in this article, this is only one side to what teachers may experience working in China. As for myself, I have experienced both sides of the coin and, being the optimist that I am, will be going back, hopefully to experience the good side of working in an environment of learning and positive growth once again.

The importance of Early Years Education

Teaching young learners is, in many countries, regarded as lesser work than teaching high school students. One country that is beginning to see the value of a solid, well thought out Early Years Education curriculum is China.

For generations the immense focus on the last few years of high-school has blotted out the need for a stable, Early Years foundation. Parents, teachers and school administrators are desperate to have their children/students attend good universities either in China or abroad. As a result, education is largely regarded as a chore or not as important until late middle school and high-school when students are pressured to not just memorise words and formulas but suddenly begin expressing their learnt knowledge in internationally accepted ways – in methods they most likely hadn’t experienced prior to that stage.

Which brings me to why education at all levels should be given equal weight, respect and attention. From personal experience, I can say that guiding students at a kindergarten is no less challenging than teaching them at the highschool level. In fact, at times, I felt like the former was indeed a lot more difficult than the latter. I realized that I felt that way, especially in China, because of a lack of understanding and support for Early Education practicioneers.

Why would Kindergarten or the early grades of Primary be as important as the last few years of Secondary school? The answer can be found in many schools across China today. High school students in international schools wishing to go abroad to study have, with the assistance of a skewed system, ignored developing their learning and critical thinking skills. The end result is hundreds of teens being forced to attend extra classes on evenings and weekends, memorising tremendous amounts of work in hopes of memorising the right answers for the upcoming exams, a general feeling of never-ending lethargy and a genuine dislike for school.

It is no secret that if a person loves what he/she does then the chances of success are increased hundredfold. Where better to allow students to start enjoying school than from the very beginning? With the right nurturing from the Kindergarten level students can grow into a way of thinking that is open-minded, inquisitive and critical. With these tools (in addition to so many more that students learn in the formative years of their schooling) children move forward through the system not as prisoneers but as pioneers.

Teaching in China: Why you should be lying to your recruiter!

About a decade ago, when I was fresh out of highschool applying for jobs through recruitment agencies, agents knew that I had little to know experience in a work environment (in a place like Sydney, experience is crucial even for the most basic jobs). They were smart enough to give me tips on how to convince my potential future employer how I was a suitable candidate and yes, that included lying and manipulating words to your advantage.

At the end of the day, these recruiters understood that employers weren’t going to be paying me an hourly rate of $18/hr for my looks, obviously they already had a system in place to make quadruple the money invested in me back in sales or services rendered, etc.

Fast forward some 10 years, now that I have my university education and expertise in my field, every single recruiter (in China) wants to sign me up tomorrow. Of course, I had to work hard to get to this point and I have high requirements. When I tell them what my salary expectations they quickly get offended replying with comments like “this is china” and “too much”.

You might be thinking that’s great for you, but how’s this relevant for me?

Here’s the thing, people like me are rejecting alot of teaching jobs that are coming out of China. The recruiters for these jobs are the laziest people that you will be in contact with. The literally see all of their clients (on both sides) as a quick cash grab. You can use this flaw against them.

Are you getting rejected by recruiters because:

  • You don’t have a degree.
  • You dob’t have the citizenship of a so-called “Native English Speaking” country.
  • There’s some requirements that’s automatically disqualifying you from the job within the first 2 minutes.

Well here’s the solution for you, LIE!

If anything, you will be doing these recruiters a favor as they are getting a nice sum of $$$ for every teacher that successfully signs up at a school. All you are doing is bypassing their lack of skill, in other words you’re doing their job for them. I am quite serious about this, lie and cheat your way until you get a chance to impress the school (interview/demo lesson). Once you have impressed the school (and negotiated your benefits), you can bring up your flaws, treat it like there’s been a miscommunication.

Schools WILL hire you if they like you enough!

Chinese rules and laws only apply when it suits them, this means that they don’t necessarily comply with their own laws if they don’t feel like it. I personally have witnessed schools hiring people that don’t have any of the requirements listed on their job descriptions. The fact is, schools will hire anyone if they are desperate enough. That person could be you if you know how to play your cards well.

So, the next time you have a recruitment agent questioning you. LIE! Even if the agent bothers enough to get off their ass to find out that you’re lying. You’ve burned your bridge with 1 agent, there’s 1000’s of others to burn :D. In the telemarketing world we call these people “Gate Keepers”, because they’re standing in-between you and your future job!

5 Tips on acquiring high paying teaching job in China.

Yes, it’s that time of the year again. The schools are out, students and teachers alike are enjoying a well earned break as the 2015-2016 academic year comes to an end in China.

Tip 1: Don’t underestimate your value!

Too often I see skilled teachers with years of experience accepting salaries way below their potential. Even if you weren’t a teacher back home, it doesn’t mean you don’t bring highly needed skills and knowledge into your potential future classroom. Never under sell yourself, because Chinese recruiters and schools generally aren’t as generous as they should be (especially since you will be the main reason why most parents will be willing to send their kids to that particular school).

Tip 2: Do your research thoroughly!

This is another very common mistake first time teachers make in China. Training centers and recruiters do their best to convince us that 6,000 – 10,000 RMB is a huge amount of money (especially since local teachers are getting paid less than you *the pity card*). The fact is, as a newcomer to China, everything will cost you more than it does for the locals, even other expats would have found ways to save money over the years. Do you research on forums, join Facebook groups of the region your interested in going and ask around what is the average salary for someone like you (don’t go on what recruiters tell you).

Tip 3: Negotiate and Negotiate Hard!!!

Business in schools is very much the same as in class discipline. If you come across weak, desperate for a job, willing to accept any salary they offer you. You’ve already lost. After your probation period, it won’t be long they will make excuses to pay you less, make deduction from your salary because you were 2 minutes late to class, etc. By negotiating a higher salary from the get go, you are telling your employers that they need you more than you need them.

Tip 4: Know when to accept a job.

If you play it safe and accept the first job that comes your way, the chances are you won’t be receiving the highest possible salary that you deserve. Think about it, when are schools most likely to make the highest offers? When they are the most desperate of course. The trick is to not be desperate to be hired yourself. Let me share a personal experience with you all.
This time last year I was living with my parents in Turkey, after searching and applying to 100’s of jobs I was getting desperate to find a job and get out of Turkey (away from my parents, hehe). It was so bad that I was considering training center jobs that paid as low as 10,000 RMB. But, you see I had already done my research and based on my experience and qualifications, I knew I wanted 20,000 rmb after tax (because that’s what I deserve). It was then that a recruitment agent put me in contact with an international school. Before long the school offered me 22,000 RMB after tax plus free accommodation on campus. Eventhough I hadn’t negotiated a higher salary (since it was the highest offer I had received). They tried to reduce their offer to 20,000 RMB at a later date and I refused. I told them they would either higher me at 22,000 or I wouldn’t work for them (that was a very risky bluff), they accepted to pay 22,000 RMB.

Tip 5: It’s a numbers game!

I’m sure you have heard of this line many times before in many other topics. It also works true for finding your ideal job. If you apply to enough jobs, if you have done your homework and your salary expectation is within reason. Then you will definitely find that high paying job that you’re looking for, there’s no doubt about it.

Classroom Discipline! (classroom management tips for teachers)

assertivediscipline

There are hundreds if not thousands of articles about achieving and maintaining discipline in the classsroom, however, when I started out as a new teacher, none of the things I read really seemed to help me much in the savage world of the Trinidadian highschool system. Even when I went to China I still struggled, this time not so much with antagonistic, teen angst rebelliousness, just restlessness from younger students.

The thing is, I learned a lot. I learned from each experience and I was able to fine-tune the knowledge I had gained with concrete practice during a TEFL course I did not too long ago.

I want to share my hard-earned lessons with the hope that teachers everywhere can benefit. Teaching is not as easy as some think, but it does not have to be a nightmare either.

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1. Be the authority!

If you know you have a soft heart then put on a stern face before you even get to the school. Straighten your shoulders, walk smartly and fake that know-it-all confidence. Do not look frightened, they will try to test you, especially the class bullies, the bored but smart ones, and those afraid that they’re not intelligent enough to keep up with the work. Remember that your classroom is not a democracy – you are responsible not only for their education but their safety and well-being for every period that you have them. That isn’t to say that you can’t be friendly with them, however you must not allow yourself to smile until –

classroom-management

2. You establish the rules first.

Some teachers encourage a class discussion to establish rules. I say the safest way, especially with older students, is to establish your rules first then invite the class to set additional guidelines or rules for the class. Remember to do your rules, clearly, concisely and firmly. Also, do not start the class until you’ve finished the discussion and establishment of all the rules. There are several ways you can introduce rules, but in my experience the clearer you are, the better you are understood. Beat the dead horse, folks.

no-running

3. Good rules vs. Bad rules.

The words you use can sometimes go over students’ heads, especially young ESL  learners. Our language has to be clear and impacting.

An example of a good rule is clearly, loudly (not shouting, only projecting) and firmly saying “No running!” possibly accompanied by a picture of someone running that has been crossed out. Furthermore, having a rewards and consequences system in a good way to clearly let students know that there will be punishments for breaking the rules. Just remember to consistently enforce both rewards and punishments every time if you choose to do this.

An example of a poorly laid out rule is saying very sweetly and uncertainly “Be safe…” accompanied by the words printed on a nice background. Kids are more likely to ignore those that do not give them pause, which is why you need to –

aAwesome-teacher-1

4. Be larger than life when teaching.

Capture and maintain their attention by projecting your voice in a way that is not harmful nor energy expending for you. You can say something like “Ok, class! Let’s begin!” or “Attention!” (In Chinese schools a literal call to attention actually works as this is how quite a few Chinese teachers get their attention.) If this is not possible, then practice your very best death-glare to instill silence, then speak at normal volume, forcing them to either stay quiet or miss what you have to say. (Always wait for absolute silence before you begin your class! Do not ever allow a student to speak while you are speaking!)

Alternatively, you could use some rhythmic clapping, a song, tapping your marker sharply on your whiteboard, a whistle or a bell. Frankly, anything startling enough to draw their attention to you will work. An important thing to note is that you need to maintain the level of energy you begin with, or even take it higher sometimes, as the students will copy your example, verbal, non-verbal and even emotional.

However, only half of the energy you project will be reflected or produced by the students and that is why you need to be a superstar in the classroom; I’m not saying that your lesson should be teacher-centered, no. Authority-wise, they should respect you and interest-wise they should be eager to listen to you. Be animated, be fun! And always be prepared to –

640px-Professor-Minerva-McGonagall-professor-mcgonagall-7083850-852-357

5. Reign it in when necessary.

If you keep on maintaining good eye contact through the appropriate times of your lesson, say when you are presenting something new, then that scanning alone should be able to prevent any misbehavior. However, this is not always the case, some students are distracted regardless and sometimes teachers may not always notice trouble brewing until it has erupted. Never fear, even if you don’t nip it in the bud, you are still in control.

Maintain your cool. Depending on your classroom, the age of the students and which part of the world you are teaching in, etc, you will have different options available to you. Always take a minute, if possible, to assess the situation. Think of how you can let the student know that their actions are wrong without resorting to any negative language. Look at the student sternly until eye-contact is achieved. Approach slowly whilst keeping eye-contact and simply put away whatever the student was playing with, or confiscate it. If the misdemeanor was talking in class or something similar you can calmly ask the student to repeat or read the class rules. If you have a rewards and consequence system in place then enforce it neatly and place more focus on how they can gain rewards in the future through good behavior, for example:  “Next time you can get a sticker if you follow the rules.”

If you do not have such a system in place and you are met with refusal simply say “Ok, after class, then.” and proceed with your class. At the end of class stand at the door so the student doesn’t escape, have him or her sit down with you and just have a chat with them. Try to understand and not accuse – you have the opportunity to show them compassion. Sometimes trouble makers just want some TLC.

Well, good people, these are a few of the most important (in my experience) classroom management tools that I’ve picked up over the years. Let me know if they are helpful to you and what other techniques you’ve learned through your experiences!

How economies effect a foreign teachers salary.

In this article I will discuss how economies effect a foreign teachers salary and I will also touch on why it’s important for you to be aware of it.

Okay, let’s say that you signed a contract early August 2015, you flew out to China by September and you have been teaching and saving your money (for whatever purpose; paying of debts, funding your next trip abroad, saving up for a business venture). Early August 2015, the conversion rate of Chinese RMB to US Dollar was: 1 USD = 6.3 RMB approximately. At this point, you might be saying, what’s the point of all this? Well my friend, you’ll see soon enough.

Now, again let’s assume for the sake of the argument that you are a qualified teacher in your home country and you accepted an offer for 19,000 RMB over a 10 month contract. Now this is the part how economies effect a foreign teachers salary. When you signed up over a year ago, you did your math and calculated you would be getting paid $3K USD per month, giving you a net pay of $30K over a 10 month contract, Great! Fast forward to today, as I am writing this article (6/July/2016, 10:55 AM) RMB hit a record high: 1 USD = 6.959. It’s a record high, that’s great right? NO!

How economies effect a foreign teachers salary.
The graph of Chinese RMB losing value over a period of 12 months.

What this means is that over that period of almost 1 year, the money that you have saved has just lost value be 10%. So, in reality, you didn’t accept a job for $3K per month, you accepted a job that was paying $2.7K per month.

There’s a similar story if you had accepted a job in Malaysia. If you had signed up for a 2 year contract around July/August 2014 where $1 USD = 3 RM (Malaysian Ringgit), you would be surprised to find out for the past year, it has been floating around $1 USD = 4 RM. So last year, all foreign teachers received a 33% pay cut (unless some were lucky enough to renegotiate their salaries).

How economies effect a foreign teachers salary.
The graph of Malaysian RM losing value over a period of 24 months.

So, before you accept your next job offer, consider the state of your target countries economic state and negotiate well accordingly.

How to find a job in China

how to find a job in china

China

A country, an idea, a dream come true, an exercise in patience. People who visit China for a short term rarely have the opportunities to really experience the incredible and many times, unbelievable, things that will happen to you while living here. Those that want to come live here very rarely have any clue as to what to expect or how to navigate their way to better jobs, apartments and places to buy the things they need. In this post I’ll look at how a person wishing to come to China to find work as a teacher can secure a decent job via the worldwide web.

How to find a job in China:

Step 1. Sign up to a few major job search websites.

Websites like the famous Dave’s Esl cafe, Serious Teachers and (my personal favorite) EChinacities are the starting place for all teachers who want to work as foreign teachers in China. Ensure that your CV is up to date and well formatted, and documents such as your degree certificate and/or any other relevant certificates are scanned and clearly visible when you open them on your device. Go to the above websites and create accounts, upload your documents and begin sending applications to all the jobs you want. They are free to register with and use and their databases are huge as schools in China are very well aware of them and use them as a main source of finding their foreign teachers. Cover letters are a nice touch so if you see a job that looks like the right one for you be sure to write one going into some detail as to why you’d be the best teacher for the job.

Step 2. Ask all the questions.

Seriously. Ask the person that contacts you about doing an interview everything you can. Questions like what salary range is being offered for the position, if the figures quoted are before or after tax (that actually makes a huge difference in numbers, I’m talking thousands of RMB worth of difference here), if there’ll be any extra duties or if you’ll be required to work on weekends or evenings. Things like how many sick days you’ll be getting and whether your insurance is paid for or not. Also, most importantly, ask about their disciplinary policies for teachers – deductions from your salary for punctuality/behavior/not turning in lesson plans on time? Ask about airfare reimbursement and housing allowance. Be extremely careful if they make a salary offer at the beginning of your talks and change it after a few days because you don’t have some special qualification or the other – that’s just untrustworthy and a real red flag that the school can actually afford to pay you way more than what they’re offering but being stingy to funnel the money meant for foreign teachers elsewhere (yes, that is a personal experience I witnessed and went through myself!).

3. Read and re-read the contract they send to you.

And do not agree to sign until you confirm that they can fully provide you with a Z working visa and something called an FEC (Foreign Expert Certificate) or an Alien Employment Certificate. Schools that are registered as such in China will provide teachers with FECs but places like language training centers and places designed for after-school lessons can’t hire ‘teachers’, only employ ‘trainers’ so their documentation requirements are slightly different. Furthermore, after you sign a contract no changes should be made to it. no adjustment of any pages, policies – nothing. I have heard stories of contracts being altered in front of the people who signed them. That is illegal, do not let anyone tamper with your contract.

Notes on recruiters

Once you sign up on one of the websites and keep applying for jobs, it won’t be long until you have recruiters calling you every minute to set up interviews. Always stand your ground and insist on what you want – they need you more than you need them. Teachers are much more in demand and much less available in China than other Asian countries. My partner Mustafa highlights some of the struggles he faces with recruiters on our current job hunt for positions in China in the video below.

When you are hired

Remember that you will not have your passport for a couple of weeks after you arrive, that’s how long it takes for the PSB in China to get your FEC. So, don’t book anything too far in advance or anything that you can’t cancel easily! Also, there will be an adjustment period that could be potentially difficult – give yourself at least two months before making any decisions as to whether you want to stay at that job or find another. With that in mind, don’t stop searching and applying to jobs until those initial two months are over. Most likely those two months will be a probationary period as stated in your contract and you could leave (or be fired!) with very little to no negative consequences for both yourself and the school.

In all, that’s a little bit from me and Mustafa on finding jobs in China. More posts on this topic will grace this website soon, if you have any questions or comments, feel free to leave them in the comments section below and we’ll get back to you, pronto! Good luck!

TEFL – Is it the right course for you?

On May 23rd, 2016, Mustafa and I began our TEFL (Teaching English as a Foreign Language) course here in Chiang Mai. Even before we’d started we knew that we’d made the right choice and by the end of the first day we were feeling positive, welcome and absolutely enthused about the next couple of weeks.

Originally, we’d considered doing a CELTA course in Bangkok. However, due to the very strict demands of the application process as well as the stressful nature of the course (or so it was presented to us), we eventually decided to look at other options.

Why would we have wanted to do a CELTA or even a TEFL course, when we had already been teaching for years, you might ask? Well, as much experience as we both have, we both know that our teaching methods can be improved. Furthermore, having a certificate of being a trained ESL teacher is invaluable, especially in South East Asia and even more so in China.

So, there we were at our lovely hotel in Bangkok, scouring the internet for TEFL schools with excellent reputations, comparable course structure and accredited by some sort of educational authority when we hit gold. We’d found the SEE TEFL website. With very little time to lose I gave the director, Mr. John Quinn, a quick phone call to find out some more information. Imagine my surprise when the director not only responded very quickly to my call but was very accommodating and genuinely patient with all my questions. It was a rare and extremely heartening experience to be treated so kindly by the director of a school. With such a warm reception, Mustafa and I made up our minds and within a few days put down our deposit for the very next course start date.

However, our experience is, of course, unique. If you are unsure whether or not you want to fly to Thailand to do either a CELTA or a TEFL course I have prepared a few questions you can ask yourself to help you decide.

  1. Are you a little (or a lot) unsure about the technical, i.e. grammar rules, phonetics and phonology, aspects of the English language?
  2. Are you a person that wants to work in an environment that will teach you how to create a learning environment that is genuine and supportive?
  3. Do you feel like you would need a little more guidance or support in terms of learning, receiving constructive assistance and finding a job after your course is completed?

Now, if your answers to these questions are strong maybes or yeses then doing the SEE (Siam Educational Experience) TEFL  course would be your best choice. I say it unashamedly because, after researching many other TEFL courses available, this one stood out in terms of support, clarity and results. Also, if your answers to the above questions are yes then a CELTA may be a bit daunting and time/energy consuming.

As a further bonus, if you decide up to 45 days in advance that you want to do this course SEE offers a $200 USD discount. In Chiang Mai that extra cash can cover up to ten days’ worth of living expenses, on a moderate (travel, food and accommodation) budget.

Is a CELTA worth more than a TEFL you might ask? Not anymore. The TEFL course offered at SEE is, impressively (and very usefully for trainees hoping to work in Thailand with a work permit after the course), backed by a license from the Thai Ministry of Education. Not only that, it is internationally certified by the global leader in conformity and assessment services, the Bureau Veritas, and accredited by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service. If that’s not a nice chewy mouthful for future employers, then I don’t know what is!

To wrap things up, I am extremely happy that I chose to do the TEFL course with SEE. It’s more than just an academic course, there are Thai language and culture lessons and the pace of the course suits me and my partner just fine. There are many positive reviews online and I encourage you to do a bit of research so that you can see that my blog is not a one-off.

You can take a look at this exclusive interview with the director of SEE, Mr. John Quinn, wherein he answers many more questions about TEFL, Thailand and the ESL world of work. He gives us deeper insight into some of the course content as well as the kinds of people who have taken this course before (the oldest they’ve had was 70 years old!) and what type of person is really appropriate for the course (non-native English speakers and persons without bachelor’s degrees have been successful at gaining employment after the course!).

Also, if you have decided to make the leap and come to Chiang Mai to do this wonderful course then I encourage you to hit the link below and sign up, now. Remember, if you sign up early you can get as much as $200 discounted off your fee. Good luck and have fun.

Go to the SEE TEFL website, now!