Where is Trinidad and Tobago for dummies (with no access to internet)

When people ask me where I’m from my first response is usually a dramatic sigh. “Not this again..” is what I’m almost always thinking. “This” being the endless double-takes, puzzled looks and assumptive questions guessing at where Trinidad and Tobago might be.

So you’ve met someone from the Caribbean, wait, some people don’t even know where that region is, so…let’s go with close to America. That gives a person a little more than “Somewhere on Earth, possibly Africa.” to go on. How else do I direct them geographically if no phone with data or wifi is available?

I use some sort of object like a napkin or a book or failing having any of these, my own palms. I have the person imagine North, Central and South America to the left of what I’m using. I ask them to imagine Central America as having a sort of “C” shape. I then say that the Caribbean, which has a lot of countries, is in the ocean a little further out from that “C” shape and that Trinidad and Tobago can be found all the way down, next to a country in South America called Venezuela.

It’s all well and good if the person speaks English. In the eventuality the person does not, I just say Mars. Why, because…….(I really wanted to write “YOLO” but I’m too dignified for that mess…)

 

 

Or am I?

 

 

YOLO.

Feminism in Korea: The Ultimate Tease!

Writing an article like this seems like a suicide mission, albeit I feel obliged to inform my fellow man. Now, don’t misunderstand. I don’t believe in hating in any shape or form, but there are times in my life where I have wished I was capable of such things. Usually, females were the cause of such emotions.

Generally, I have the philosophy of understanding conflicts rather than adding fuel to the fire by simply hating. At the same time, the injustice, the pain that I see is that men are suffering all over the world. No one seems have the slightest sympathies for men’s issues.

Okay, let’s get into it! Why was South Korea (RoK) such a shock to me?

Note: The above half of the article was written on 6th of September 2016, amidst a mini/personal crisis.

Since its been a good 2 weeks I have left South Korea for Thailand, I can reflect back on that time with little emotional influence on my writing.

So what happened? To be honest, South Korea mainly sucked for me. Why you ask? Well… the truth is I was alone. I felt like I was under attack by radical feminists as I read more into the history and social issues of South Korea. In fact, I had barely any interaction with the locals. It was like nothing I had ever experienced before. I walked for many kilometers and many hours, yet I failed to make eye contact with a single person. It was as if I was a ghost walking through a town. I was longing the days of being pushed around in the metro/subway systems in China.

Maybe it’s too soon for met to judge South Korea, but I would have to say though, it is a girl’s paradise/heaven. Especially if you love to shop. But be prepared, South Korea is not a budget country.

I will summarise by saying, if you’re a single guy, don’t go to South Korea on your own. You’ll end up returning back home depressed and hungover from all the flavored Soju. Also, I will take my Australian BBQ over Korean BBQ any day of the week :D. I think South Korea can potentially be really fun if you meet the following conditions: 1. You’re either traveling there as a group or you’re a girl. 2. Money is not an issue for you, you can shop as much as you’d like. 3. You’re a young person or have the mentality of one.

I don’t want to sound like an old geezer… but there is much better times to be had spending a lot less money.

That white stuff

It is everywhere. In packets at seven eleven, in cups and dispensers at restaurants, in all the food, in all the soup broths, – just everywhere.

At first I thought it was sugar, as it certainly didn’t taste like salt! It wasn’t sweet either, but I thought maybe it was a very weak, highly processed sugar, or some bland spice. I couldn’t figure it out because my mind did not want to accept the horibble truth.

It was our first day in Thailand, we’d just gotten off the train from the airport to the downtown and were looking for something to eat. We’d found a noodle place outside a seven eleven and decided the prices looked good and the patrons there seemed to be enjoying their good-sized portions of food. We each ordered a different, unpronounceable dish off the menu and sat down to wait for our food.

Whilst waiting I took note of all the different sauces and spices one could add to their dish. There was dry powdered red chili, a clear liquid with green chilis, soy sauce, what looked like fish sauce and a white crystal-like substance in a cup which I couldn’t identify.

I tasted it and so did Mustafa but we were still clueless as to what it was. I looked around at the other people eating their food and saw one guy putting great heaping tablespoonfuls of the stuff into his noodles. He clearly loved it. Whatever it was.

Fast forward to nearly three and a half weeks later. I had, by this time, just started taking the white crystal stuff at every restaurant for granted. It was night time, around 7pm. We had just eaten dinner with our new classmates and had decided to grab a few things from seven eleven for breakfast. We were looking for salt and I saw a packet on one of the shelves but neither Mustafa nor I could determine if it was salt or that mystery substance. So we asked one of the helpful staff. It wasn’t salt.

It was MSG. Monosodium glutamate. The entire country uses it in almost every dish. Not only is it already in the food but it’s put as a flavor additive on the table for you, I’d you think your food isn’t tasty enough you can simply trick your brain by adding more msg.